Mental Illness & Jealousy.

It’s a very real thing to feel jealous of other people. Most of us envy someone for something at some time in our lives. This is pretty normal, human behaviour.

We often make ourselves feel awful because other people seemingly have it better than we do. A bigger house, a nicer car. Children, pets, other wonderful things that we long for but cannot or do not have. The person you envy, may envy you for something in your life you have that they don’t. It’s all very relative. Don’t beat yourself up for feeling envious or jealous of people for things you wish you had, but don’t dwell on them either.

I’d quite like to just be able to say ‘yes’ to any invite, to be able to just go to town and shop or go out for dinner or to the cinema, but my anxiety makes it hard for me to achieve that. Yes, it frustrates me and I do sometimes feel jealous of people who can live spontaneously, like I used to before this mental illness took hold. I also feel grateful for being able to spend time at home, eating with my family and curling up in my bed to watch a movie with my pupdog. I can shop online if I need to and to be honest, I prefer that anyway.

There are people who have worked hard for things in their lives and people who you may think haven’t done so. Unless you know the person very well, you don’t have a clue what their adversities are, what their emotional well being is and whether or not they are truly as happy as they seem. We are all guilty of bending the truth now and then to make things in our lives seem better than they may actually be. Telling people you are okay, when really you’re everything but. So just take things with a pinch of salt. Everything is not what it seems and you may be surprised.

There are many things in my life that I wish were different but the biggest one is finding the old me again. I wish I could go on girls nights again, I wish I could have those friends back again, that I can just go and enjoy life – really enjoy it to it’s fullest. Go on holiday. Go and do a weekly food shop. Apply for any job and not have to worry about going there. Normal everyday things become a massive chore. Anxiety is hard to live with. People don’t understand it and often give ‘advice’ that is about as useful as a chocolate teapot. I can’t just ‘think positive’ and ‘not worry’ that isn’t how this works.

I have noticed that I  find myself less jealous, the longer I live with my mental illnesses but every now and then, it creeps in and makes me feel like shit. I hate that I feel jealous in the first place which then makes me feel even shittier about the circumstances that made me feel the jealousy. It’s a huge, shitty vicious circle of negativity. I can be hard to drag yourself out of that tornado of shite but remember the storm will end eventually. The calm will swing by and you after spend a while cleaning up the mess it created, you can live to the best of your ability again. Enjoy the calm after the storm and try and prepare for the inevitable next one.

Life is hard. Life with mental illness is harder. Additional hurdles and obstacles are always in your way. Don’t beat yourself up for how you feel, life is a tough ride and you are doing great.

Thrive.

Breathing in and breathing out. 

Big deep breaths, release the doubt. 

Free your mind, empty your head. 

Get on up, up out of bed. 

Start the day with a grateful soul.

Too much sadness takes it’s toll.

Love fiercely, drop your guard. 

Push yourself and work hard. 

Follow your dreams, that’s what they say.

Open your heart, it leads the way. 

Push through the struggle, against the tide. 

Wade through life, it’s a beautiful ride. 

Soak up the sun, gaze at the moon. 

Live life fully, ’cause it all ends too soon. 

Walk a mile in my shoes…

Every person in life will have a different journey. Though experiences may be similar, events, friends & family may be the same, the journey will always be different.

It’s all personal, the way each of us experience the same situations and encounter various people. We’re built up and broken down at different times and in different ways. You may be able to relate to certain things other people say, or do but you will never truly know exactly how the rest of the population experiences things.

People struggle with different things, and everyone has something they are dealing with, whether you know it or not. I happen to be very open with my mental illness journey, ergo many people already kind of know what’s going on with me. However, there are days and weeks where I don’t show just how I feel, where the wall goes up and the ‘smiley, I am okay’ Emily surfaces. This isn’t because I can’t say anything, but because I don’t want to.

I have gotten quite good at my Emily act and it’s very easy for my to keep the sensitive, troubled Emily Rose hidden away to the outside world. Many people who meet me are surprised when I reveal that I suffer with mental illness. It’s almost comical to see how their faces simply can’t compute the bubbly smile with an internal hatred of self. It’s a constant draining battle to keep that façade but ultimately, it’s the way of the world. Most people ask how you are as a pleasantry, not because they’re genuinely interested in the inner workings of your brain that day.

You see, despite most people knowing that I have mental illness, I still feel the stigma and I do feel [insert a million negative emotions] for the way certain things can completely change my mood. The happiest situations can still bring on a negative emotion in my head. Which is then followed with a butterfly effect of things that begin the anxiety fuelled spiral into the darkest depths of my beautifully broken brain.

I don’t think we will ever fully understand each other, but we still need to spend the time being open with those we trust. Sharing our experiences and feelings on the different things we all experience, even day-to-day things. It’s important to talk and to listen. To have that human connection and grow strong relationships with people who can help you along in your journey. To build each other up and support each other through the good and the bad times.

Walk a mile in my shoes!?  All this gets you is a mile travelled and possible sore feet because my shoes won’t fit you properly. However, your feet will heal and at the end of it, you won’t know me any better, you won’t feel anything like I feel.  My journey is mine and it’s never going to match yours.